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VIDEO: Ann Coulter “causes” murder in tonight’s Law & Order

image Ann Coulter weighs perhaps 104 pounds but she sure carries a lot of weight.

I’ve mentioned both (our!) columnist Ann Coulter, and radio host Rush Limbaugh a bit here lately for various reasons (all good), but coincidentally, tonight (Friday February 2 2007) the NBC network show Law & Order is using the both of them for more nefarious anti-conservative (conservative hate propaganda?) purposes.  Because the media hates conservatives and want you to too.

The ever great Media Research Center (visit them for daily examples of overt liberal media bias) wrote up a piece on how the show Law & Order is using (our!) Ann Coulter and Rush Limbaugh in tonight’s episode.

NBC promo clip:
Law and Order

imageWatch video in Windows Media Video

imageWatch using Real Media

Law & Order: Coulter ‘Causes’ Murder,
Has Drinks With Limbaugh

The plot of tonight’s (Friday) Law & Order on NBC will revolve around a “right-wing” character who is clearly inspired by Ann Coulter and who brags about having a drink with “Rush.” In a 20 second promo aired this week for the February 2 episode that will air at 10pm EST/PST, the announcer touts how “a controversial speaker causes a campus shooting.” A detective calls the Coulter character “a real pain in the a[ss]-” before the promo cuts to a scene of her excusing herself from the DA’s office: “I’ve got drinks with Rush.”

NBC.com’s page for Law & Order: www.nbc.com

The Coulter character is played by a beautiful blonde, though huskier than the real Coulter, actress Charlotte Ross. She is probably best-known for playing “Detective Connie McDowell” on ABC’s NYPD Blue. 

TV Guide.com offered a […] rundown with the political edge: “A student is shot at a politically charged college assembly and the investigation leads to a Ph.D. student dealing in embryonic stem-cell research who feels threatened by the tactics of the assembly speaker (Charlotte Ross)—a right-wing conservative.” See: www.tvguide.com

Of course, Law & Order often delivers plot twists which take the storyline away from the suspect featured in promos and as the show initially unfolds, so it’s possible the Coulter character won’t, in the end, be who motivated or caused the shooting.

(The MRC’s Karen Hanna, who is inexplicably abandoning the MRC next week for other employment, first alerted me to the Coulter-themed episode.)

This would not be the first slam at Coulter this week on an NBC drama series. As Noel Sheppard recounted in a Monday NewsBusters item ( newsbusters.org ), on Sunday’s Crossing Jordan, a program centered around a crime-solving coroner in Boston, she was castigated by name. In the midst of a race riot, as “Dr. Nigel Townsend” (played by Steve Valentine) attended to a whiny blonde woman, he asked:

“So, how long have you suffered from ‘ACS?’” She gave him a blank stare and so he explained: “Ann Coulter Syndrome, wherein the afflicted gains strength through the hatred of others.” She answered in a voice clearly designed to somewhat sound like Coulter: “Niceness is overrated. I never saw the point. It’s all based on lies anyway. ‘How are you?’ ‘˜Have a nice weekend.’ The truth is I don’t give a crap how you are or what kind of a weekend you have.”

And back on May 25, 2005, the season finale of Law & Order’s sister show, Law & Order: Criminal Intent, portrayed then-House Majority Leader Tom DeLay as a hero to white supremacist gun nuts suspected of murdering two judges, one of them black, and who had expressed the view that the white woman judge who was murdered was a “race traitor” who raised her family in the “Zionist enclave of Riverdale.”

When the ballistics on the bullet which killed the black judge showed it was fired by the same rifle which was used to kill the white judge, New York City Police Department “Detective Alexandra Eames” suggested to her fellow detectives and an Assistant District Attorney: “Maybe we should put out an APB for somebody in a Tom DeLay T-shirt.” Another detective then presented evidence the shooter came from the West, prompting Eames to point out: “Home of a lot of white supremacist groups.”

For a full transcript of the scene, MP3 audio as well as Real and Windows Media video, check the May 26, 2005 MRC CyberAlert: www.mrc.org

Back to Friday’s Law & Order, a transcript of the promo spot aired during Tuesday’s Law & Order: SVU:

Announcer: “Friday, a controversial speaker-”

Ann Coulter character in a chair and holding glass of wine: “People love me.” 

Announcer over video of man tumbling down steps of auditorium: “-causes a campus shooting.” 

“Detective Ed Green,” played by Jesse Martin: “You just became a real pain in the a-” 

Announcer: “If you like Law & Order surprises-” 

Coulter character in the DA’s office, holding cell phone: “I’ve got drinks with Rush.” 

Announcer: “-wait for the trial.” 

Executive Assistant District Attorney “Jack McCoy,” played by Sam Waterston: “Let’s not pretend we don’t know what’s going on.” 

Announcer: “All new Law & Order. Friday on NBC.”

For those who have missed the first 17 seasons of Law & Order, the show is about New York City detectives solving a crime and then the prosecutors who go to trial.

—Brent Baker
[Media Research Center]

Clearly the left takes Ann Coulter, Rush Limbaugh, and others like them extremely seriously, and feel very threatened by them and their message and the fact that their message is getting out.  Thus they seek to marginalize them as best they can and mock them in order to push their leftist agenda. 

How To talk To A Liberal If You MustAs Ann Coulter says in her New York Times best-seller (her 4th of 5 best sellers) called How To talk To A Liberal (If You Must),

“You must outrage the enemy.  If the liberal you’re arguing with doesn’t become speechless with sputtering, impotent rage, you’re not doing it right.”

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Contact the Editor: Joel Johannesen

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